Kona Underwater Portfolio

Longfin Anthias (Pseudanthias hawaiiensis), Garden Eel Cove, Kona, Hawaii.

Longfin Anthias (Pseudanthias hawaiiensis), Garden Eel Cove.

My wife and I went on a scuba diving vacation in Kona a couple of months ago. We used to do this kind of thing at least once a year, but recently, life has gotten in the way and we haven’t been able to find the opportunity as often. With my social media consulting practice in full swing, work has been busy and the time off was very welcome.
Dwarf Moray Eel (Gymnothorax melatremus), Kona, Hawaii.

Dwarf Moray Eel (Gymnothorax melatremus).

Of course, life underwater isn’t complete without a camera, so I brought back a few photos to add to the portfolio. In case anyone is wondering, I still shoot an old Nikon D100 underwater in a Light & Motion Titan D100 housing with two Sea & Sea YS-90DX strobes. Old gear, but it works well, and I never felt the need to invest in an upgrade.
Blackside Hawkfish (Paracirrhites forsteri), Big Arch, Kona, Hawaii.

Blackside Hawkfish (Paracirrhites forsteri), Big Arch.

Belted Wrasse (Stethojulis balteata), Kona, Hawaii.

Belted Wrasse (Stethojulis balteata).

Whitemouth Moray Eel (Gymnothorax meleagris), Gardem Eel Cove, Kona, Hawaii.

Whitemouth Moray Eel (Gymnothorax meleagris), Gardem Eel Cove.

Undulated Moray Eel (Gymnothorax undulatus), Manta Ray Bay, Kona, Hawaii.

Undulated Moray Eel (Gymnothorax undulatus), Manta Ray Bay.

Yellowmargin Moray Eel (Gymnothorax flavimarginatus), Manta Ray Bay, Kona, Hawaii.

Yellowmargin Moray Eel (Gymnothorax flavimarginatus), Manta Ray Bay.

Devil Scorpionfish (Scorpaenopsis diabolus), Pipe Dreams, Kona, Hawaii.

Devil Scorpionfish (Scorpaenopsis diabolus), Pipe Dreams.

Commerson's Frogfish (Antennarius commersoni), Driftwood.

Commerson’s Frogfish (Antennarius commersoni), Driftwood.

Day Octopus (Octopus cyanea), Garden Eel Cove.

Day Octopus (Octopus cyanea), Garden Eel Cove.

Fuchsia Flatworm, (Pseudoceros ferrugineus), Three Room Cave.

Fuchsia Flatworm, (Pseudoceros ferrugineus), Three Room Cave.

About Peter

Senior Project Manager at Bump Networks, Operations at Mbloom, Photographer, SCUBA diver, mindwalker, lifelong geek. Connect with Peter on Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn or Facebook.

Comments

  1. Michael Declerck says:

    Great as always, Peter!

  2. Wow, Peter, these are fabulous pictures! Your work is beautiful, the colors, the composition….thanks for sharing!

  3. Hi Peter,
    I stumbled on your site through amauiblog and I love your stuff!
    I use a Nikon D80 and have been trying to find an underwater enclosure for it but have had little luck finding one that doesn’t cost an arm and a leg.
    Is this just the way it is or do you have any suggestions?

    A hui hou kakou…
    Michael

    • Aloha Michael,

      Unfortunately, for a DSLR, you expect to pay something like $1500-2500 for a housing these days because they’re big, solid and most importantly, built specifically for the camera, molded for the body with all the buttons in the right places and so on. Losing a point-and-shoot to a flood is one thing. Losing a DSLR and a lens to a flood is another. You need to think of them as an investment to provide protection for your gear.

      I bought my D100 housing at http://backscatter.com around 2003 or so, as I was living in California at the time. It’s a Light & Motion (http://uwimaging.com – I think they’ve since abandoned the DSLR market for video) and the whole outfit (with two Sea & Sea YS-90DX strobes, plus ports, arms, etc.) set me back about $3000 or so. I still use that housing today, though I had to send it in once for an electronic issue, and I’ve had a couple of strobes quit on me for no apparent reason (not floods).

      Remember the saying—there are two kinds of underwater photographers; those who have flooded their housings and those who are about to. I’m not looking forward to my day, but this is one case where I’m happy to pay for whatever odds I can get.

      Hope this helps!

  4. Amazing and beautiful shots, Peter!

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